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How Wide Or Narrow Wood Flooring Will Affect Your Décor

The way we react to things that we see is affected by the experiences we have had during our lives. If it comes to interior design or décor, the way we perceive things depends on what we're utilized to seeing in which placing. For instance, until a couple of decades back, a distressed, old floor could have been viewed as uncared for and in need of repair. Today this appearance is highly sought after, and both artificially aged and reclaimed floors are in high demand.

When it comes to narrow and wide flooring, we have a inclination to categorise these according to our own life experiences. In precisely the same way we connect hats on women with weddings, we've got a tendency to associate exceptionally polished, narrow board hardwood flooring with formal preferences (or, depending on your age, school gyms!) . What's more, in precisely the exact same way that vertical stripes have a tendency to make'chunky' people look thinner and horizontal stripes have a tendency to create everyone look'chunkier', wood flooring will impact the apparent size and shape of your room.

There is no getting away from the truth that we correlate narrow flooring more with formality than casual preferences, but this needn't always be true. In case you've got a precious, highly polished dining table by way of example and you would like it to maintain a formal and distinguished appearance, then choosing highly polished, narrow wooden floor boards provides an overall appearance of class and charm. However, if you would like the backdrop to your own table to be more relaxed, then a broad board, distressed finish hardwood flooring can allow you to achieve this feel. So, as a general guideline, if you presume narrow boards to appear more formal and wide boards to look more casual you will not go much wrong.

The other thing that wide and narrow floors will probably do for your own décor is that it is going to look to change the form and, or dimensions of a space. Here are some ideas to play if you want to change the apparent shape or dimensions of your area:


  • Small rooms. When you've got a little room, wide boards will give and feeling of larger quantity to your own room, especially if they are light colored.
  • Big rooms. In big rooms you can normally get away with narrow or broad hardwood flooring boards, but ironically, while broad boards will make a small room look larger, they are also able to produce a big room seem smaller. In big rooms, where you want the space to seem more proportioned, it's a clever trick to combine wide and narrow boards to make an illusion of bringing from the walls. For instance, if your area is rectangular, you could create a rectangle of wide or narrow boards in the middle of the room where the sides run parallel to the walls. Then, you could place a border of the other type of board around the exterior. That's to say, if you have created a central rectangle using narrow planks, you can create the border with the broad boards, or vise versa. Cutting up your room this way will cleverly reduce the impression of quantity and add interest to a décor in precisely the same moment.
  • Narrow rooms.A smart way to produce narrow rooms look wider is to utilize wide boards which are put perpendicular (at right angles) to the side of your room. The effect of this will be that your area will seem immediately wider.
  • Extended rooms. In the same way that wide boards set perpendicular to the side of narrow rooms will make the room look wider, broad boards placed perpendicular to the long side of extended rooms will make them look shorter.
While each these effects are only visual rather than actual, the ideal choice of board may make a massive difference to the look of both your décor along with your room size or measurement. All that said, with the immense choice of boards that are available now, making the proper choice for your job can seem overwhelming. So in the event that you'd like some expert help in making sure you make the right decisions, why not get in touch?

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